E-ISSN 2231-3206 | ISSN 2320-4672
 

Original Research 


Cardiovascular drug fun cricket: Students’ perception on an innovative active teaching–learning method in pharmacology

Anuradha Joshi, Jaishree Ganjiwale, Suman Singh, Devashish Palkar.

Abstract
Background: Modern teaching trends in medical education exhibit paradigm shift from conventional classroom teaching to nonconventional teaching aids. Continuous efforts are required to incorporate innovative teaching–learning methods in curriculum to make learning interesting and interactive for students.

Aims and Objective: Determine students’ perception toward an innovative, active teaching–learning method and its effect on learning.

Materials and Methods: An intervention study conducted with second-year MBBS students (n = 77) after approval from institutional ethics committee. Test group (n = 44) was taught cardiovascular pharmacology by innovative way while control group (n = 33) was taught the same topic by conventional way. Knowledge of both groups was assessed by pre and post tests of objective type while perceptions of test group toward the innovative way were documented on Likert scale by semi-structured questionnaire. A pre-activity opinion was taken to know about perceptions toward conventional pharmacology teaching from all the students. Paired and independent t-tests were applied for statistical analysis of data.

Result: There was no statistically significant difference in performance of pre- and posttest scores between the groups (p > 0.05). Students’ perceptions in the pre-activity questionnaire feedback revealed that more than 60% of students found teaching of pharmacology monotonous and not fostering active learning. About 70% students felt the need for active teaching–learning modules that can generate interest in subject. Post-activity feedback revealed that majority of students (about 66%) had enjoyed the new learning process and found it to be more engaging, interesting, and interactive.

Conclusion: Students need to be actively engaged while learning and faculty should explore novel teaching practices that help in maintaining students’ interest.

Key words: Pharmacology; Cardiovascular Cricket; Active Teaching Learning; Antihypertensive Drug


 
ARTICLE TOOLS
Abstract
PDF Fulltext
How to cite this articleHow to cite this article
Citation Tools
Related Records
 Articles by Anuradha Joshi
Articles by Jaishree Ganjiwale
Articles by Suman Singh
Articles by Devashish Palkar
on Google
on Google Scholar


REFERENCES
1. Nageswari KS, Malhotra AS, Kapoor N, Kaur G. Pedagogical effectiveness of innovative teaching methods initiated at the Department of Physiology, Government Medical College, Chandigarh. Adv Physiol Educ. 2004;28(1-4):51-8.
2. Garg A, Rataboli PV, Muchandi K. Students opinion on the prevailing teaching methods in pharmacology and changes recommended. Indian J Pharmacol. 2004;36(3):155-8.
3. Cross PK. Students learn more when they are actively involved in learning than when they are passive recipients of instruction. Am Assoc Higher Educ Bull. 1987;39:3-7.
4. Kvam PH. The effect of active learning methods on student retention in engineering statistics. Am Stat. 2000;54(2):136-40.
5. Joel M. Where’s the evidence that active learning works? Adv Physiol Educ. 2006;30(4):159-67. [DOI via Crossref]    [Pubmed]   
6. Ritzko JM, Robinson S. Using games to increase active learning. J Coll Teach Learn. 2006;3(6):45-50.
7. Barclay SM, Jeffres MN, Bhakta R. Educational card games to teach pharmacotherapeutics in an advanced pharmacy practice experience. Am J Pharm Educ. 2011;75(2):33. [DOI via Crossref]    [Pubmed]    [PMC Free Fulltext]   
8. O’Leary S, Diepenhorst L, Churley-Strom R, Magrane D. Educational games in an obstetrics and gynecology core curriculum. Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2005;193(5):1848-51. [DOI via Crossref]    [Pubmed]   
9. Odenweller CM, Hsu CT, DiCarlo SE. Educational card games for understanding gastrointestinal physiology. Am J Physiol 1998;275 (6 Pt 2):S78-84.
10. Ballon B, Silver I. Context is key: an interactive experiential and content frame game. Med Teach. 2004;26(6):525-8. [DOI via Crossref]    [Pubmed]   
11. Eckert GU, Da Rosa AC, Busnello RG, Melchior R, Masiero PR, Scroferneker ML. Learning from panel boards: T-lymphocyte and B-lymphocyte self-tolerance game. Med Teach. 2004;26(6):521-4. [DOI via Crossref]    [Pubmed]   
12. Gaikwad N, Tankhiwale S. Crossword puzzles: self-learning tool in pharmacology. Perspect Med Educ. 2012;1(5-6):237-48.
13. Rao SP, DiCarlo SE. Active learning of respiratory physiology improves performance on respiratory physiology examinations. Adv Physiol Educ. 2001;25(1-4):127-33.
14. Lewis DJ, Saydak SJ, Mierzwa IP, Robinson JA. Gaming: a teaching strategy for adult learners. J Contin Educ Nurs. 1989;20(2):80-4.
15. Hermann CP, Bays CL. Drawing to learn and win. J Nurs Educ. 1991;30(3):140-1.
16. Rowell S, Spielvogle S. Wanted: a few good bug detectives. A gaming technique to increase staff awareness of current infection control practices. J Contin Educ Nurs. 1996;27(6):274-8.
17. Jalgaonkar SV, Sarkate PV, Tripathi RK. Students’ perception about small group teaching techniques: role play method and case based learning in pharmacology. Educ Med J. 2012;4(2):13-8. [DOI via Crossref]   
18. Ulrich DL, Glendon KJ. Interactive Group Learning: Strategies for Nurse Educators, 2nd edn. , New York, NY: Springer, 2005. pp. 338-9.
19. Latessa R, Harman JH, Hardee S, Scmidt-Dalton T. Teaching medicine using interactive games: development of the ‘‘Stumpers’’ quiz show game Fam Med. 2004;36(9):616.
20. Charron HS, Korte P, Miller ML. Pills, powders, potions: pharmacology fun. J Nursing Staff Dev. 1998;14(2):105.
21. Cessario L. Utilization of board gaming for conceptual models of nursing. J Nurs Educ. 1987;26(4):167-9.
22. Premkumar K, Bonnycastle D. Games as active learning strategies: a faculty development workshop. Med Educ. 2006;40(11): 1129. [DOI via Crossref]    [Pubmed]   
23. Byrd ET, Bedini L. CSI in the classroom: using crime solving games to teach research and evaluation. J Leisure Stud Recreation Educ. 2005;20(1):118-21.
24. Millis BJ. Using Academic Games to Promote Learning Lilly South Conference on College Teaching, Greensboro, NC2006.
25. Patel J. Using game format in small group classes for pharmacotherapeutics case studies. Am J Pharm Educ. 2008;72(1):21. [DOI via Crossref]    [Pubmed]    [PMC Free Fulltext]   
26. Robert. ED.Students perceptions of the incorporation of games into classroom instruction for basic and clinical pharmacokinetics. Am J Pharm Educ. 2007;71(2):21. [DOI via Crossref]   
27. LeCroy C. Games as an innovative teaching strategy for overactive bladder and BPH. Urol Nurs. 2006;26(5):381-4. 393.
28. Resko D, Chorba M. Enhancing learning through the use of games. Dimens Crit Care Nurs. 1992;11(3):173-7. [DOI via Crossref]    [Pubmed]   
29. Bays CL, Hermann CP. Gaming versus lecture discussion: effects on students’ test performance. J Nurs Educ. 1997;36(6):292-4.
30. Massey AP, Brown SA, Johnston JD. It’s all fun and gamesyuntil they learn. J Inf Syst Educ. 2005;16(1):9-14.

How to Cite this Article
Pubmed Style

Anuradha Joshi, Jaishree Ganjiwale, Suman Singh, Devashish Palkar. Cardiovascular drug fun cricket: Students’ perception on an innovative active teaching–learning method in pharmacology. Natl J Physiol Pharm Pharmacol. 2016; 6(1): 68-73. doi:10.5455/njppp.2015.5.1610201582


Web Style

Anuradha Joshi, Jaishree Ganjiwale, Suman Singh, Devashish Palkar. Cardiovascular drug fun cricket: Students’ perception on an innovative active teaching–learning method in pharmacology. https://www.njppp.com/?mno=205308 [Access: August 03, 2022]. doi:10.5455/njppp.2015.5.1610201582


AMA (American Medical Association) Style

Anuradha Joshi, Jaishree Ganjiwale, Suman Singh, Devashish Palkar. Cardiovascular drug fun cricket: Students’ perception on an innovative active teaching–learning method in pharmacology. Natl J Physiol Pharm Pharmacol. 2016; 6(1): 68-73. doi:10.5455/njppp.2015.5.1610201582



Vancouver/ICMJE Style

Anuradha Joshi, Jaishree Ganjiwale, Suman Singh, Devashish Palkar. Cardiovascular drug fun cricket: Students’ perception on an innovative active teaching–learning method in pharmacology. Natl J Physiol Pharm Pharmacol. (2016), [cited August 03, 2022]; 6(1): 68-73. doi:10.5455/njppp.2015.5.1610201582



Harvard Style

Anuradha Joshi, Jaishree Ganjiwale, Suman Singh, Devashish Palkar (2016) Cardiovascular drug fun cricket: Students’ perception on an innovative active teaching–learning method in pharmacology. Natl J Physiol Pharm Pharmacol, 6 (1), 68-73. doi:10.5455/njppp.2015.5.1610201582



Turabian Style

Anuradha Joshi, Jaishree Ganjiwale, Suman Singh, Devashish Palkar. 2016. Cardiovascular drug fun cricket: Students’ perception on an innovative active teaching–learning method in pharmacology. National Journal of Physiology, Pharmacy and Pharmacology, 6 (1), 68-73. doi:10.5455/njppp.2015.5.1610201582



Chicago Style

Anuradha Joshi, Jaishree Ganjiwale, Suman Singh, Devashish Palkar. "Cardiovascular drug fun cricket: Students’ perception on an innovative active teaching–learning method in pharmacology." National Journal of Physiology, Pharmacy and Pharmacology 6 (2016), 68-73. doi:10.5455/njppp.2015.5.1610201582



MLA (The Modern Language Association) Style

Anuradha Joshi, Jaishree Ganjiwale, Suman Singh, Devashish Palkar. "Cardiovascular drug fun cricket: Students’ perception on an innovative active teaching–learning method in pharmacology." National Journal of Physiology, Pharmacy and Pharmacology 6.1 (2016), 68-73. Print. doi:10.5455/njppp.2015.5.1610201582



APA (American Psychological Association) Style

Anuradha Joshi, Jaishree Ganjiwale, Suman Singh, Devashish Palkar (2016) Cardiovascular drug fun cricket: Students’ perception on an innovative active teaching–learning method in pharmacology. National Journal of Physiology, Pharmacy and Pharmacology, 6 (1), 68-73. doi:10.5455/njppp.2015.5.1610201582