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Original Research 


Prediction models for peak expiratory flow rate in Indian population aged 1825 years

Prakash Kumar Nayak, Sudeep Satpathy, Magna Manjareeka, Priyadarsini Samanta, Jayanti Mishra, Bipin Bihari Pradhan.

Abstract
Background: The role of peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) has been emphasized both in diagnosis and management of patients with asthma.

Aims and Objective: The present study was undertaken to derive the prediction formulae to determine the PEFR in normal, young, healthy, nonsmoking Indian population in the age group of 1825 years.

Materials and Methods: Computerized spirometry was done in 298 nonsmoking first-year medical students of both genders. All the data were statistically analyzed and prediction equations for the young Indian population were derived.

Results: PEFR showed significant gender difference. Both height and weight showed positive correlation with PEFR in males. In females, height was positively correlated with PEFR, but age showed negative correlation. We formulated univariate and multivariate regression models for prediction of PEFR in the young Indian adults. The matched value for PEFR was found to be higher by 6%9% in males and 2%25% in females, in comparison to previous Indian studies. In males, the predicted PEFR was higher (26%) than Pakistani study group, but lower (1%8%) than Iranian and Caucasian population. The value was almost similar to African-American population. In females, the matched value was found to be higher (5%28%) than Caucasian, African-American, and Pakistani population studies, but lower by 28% compared to Iranian study.

Conclusion: The computed regression norms may be used to predict the PEFR in young Indian population of similar age group as the study population.

Key words: Indian; Peak Expiratory Flow Rate; Respiratory Function Tests; Spirometry


 
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How to Cite this Article
Pubmed Style

Prakash Kumar Nayak, Sudeep Satpathy, Magna Manjareeka, Priyadarsini Samanta, Jayanti Mishra, Bipin Bihari Pradhan. Prediction models for peak expiratory flow rate in Indian population aged 1825 years. Natl J Physiol Pharm Pharmacol. 2016; 6(3): 200-204. doi:10.5455/njppp.2016.6.05012016110


Web Style

Prakash Kumar Nayak, Sudeep Satpathy, Magna Manjareeka, Priyadarsini Samanta, Jayanti Mishra, Bipin Bihari Pradhan. Prediction models for peak expiratory flow rate in Indian population aged 1825 years. http://www.njppp.com/?mno=214967 [Access: January 02, 2022]. doi:10.5455/njppp.2016.6.05012016110


AMA (American Medical Association) Style

Prakash Kumar Nayak, Sudeep Satpathy, Magna Manjareeka, Priyadarsini Samanta, Jayanti Mishra, Bipin Bihari Pradhan. Prediction models for peak expiratory flow rate in Indian population aged 1825 years. Natl J Physiol Pharm Pharmacol. 2016; 6(3): 200-204. doi:10.5455/njppp.2016.6.05012016110



Vancouver/ICMJE Style

Prakash Kumar Nayak, Sudeep Satpathy, Magna Manjareeka, Priyadarsini Samanta, Jayanti Mishra, Bipin Bihari Pradhan. Prediction models for peak expiratory flow rate in Indian population aged 1825 years. Natl J Physiol Pharm Pharmacol. (2016), [cited January 02, 2022]; 6(3): 200-204. doi:10.5455/njppp.2016.6.05012016110



Harvard Style

Prakash Kumar Nayak, Sudeep Satpathy, Magna Manjareeka, Priyadarsini Samanta, Jayanti Mishra, Bipin Bihari Pradhan (2016) Prediction models for peak expiratory flow rate in Indian population aged 1825 years. Natl J Physiol Pharm Pharmacol, 6 (3), 200-204. doi:10.5455/njppp.2016.6.05012016110



Turabian Style

Prakash Kumar Nayak, Sudeep Satpathy, Magna Manjareeka, Priyadarsini Samanta, Jayanti Mishra, Bipin Bihari Pradhan. 2016. Prediction models for peak expiratory flow rate in Indian population aged 1825 years. National Journal of Physiology, Pharmacy and Pharmacology, 6 (3), 200-204. doi:10.5455/njppp.2016.6.05012016110



Chicago Style

Prakash Kumar Nayak, Sudeep Satpathy, Magna Manjareeka, Priyadarsini Samanta, Jayanti Mishra, Bipin Bihari Pradhan. "Prediction models for peak expiratory flow rate in Indian population aged 1825 years." National Journal of Physiology, Pharmacy and Pharmacology 6 (2016), 200-204. doi:10.5455/njppp.2016.6.05012016110



MLA (The Modern Language Association) Style

Prakash Kumar Nayak, Sudeep Satpathy, Magna Manjareeka, Priyadarsini Samanta, Jayanti Mishra, Bipin Bihari Pradhan. "Prediction models for peak expiratory flow rate in Indian population aged 1825 years." National Journal of Physiology, Pharmacy and Pharmacology 6.3 (2016), 200-204. Print. doi:10.5455/njppp.2016.6.05012016110



APA (American Psychological Association) Style

Prakash Kumar Nayak, Sudeep Satpathy, Magna Manjareeka, Priyadarsini Samanta, Jayanti Mishra, Bipin Bihari Pradhan (2016) Prediction models for peak expiratory flow rate in Indian population aged 1825 years. National Journal of Physiology, Pharmacy and Pharmacology, 6 (3), 200-204. doi:10.5455/njppp.2016.6.05012016110