E-ISSN 2231-3206 | ISSN 2320-4672
 

Original Research 


Evaluation of analgesic and antipyretic activity of Nigella sativa: an experimental study

Harshal N Pise, Sushma S Jadhav.

Cited by (3)

Abstract
Background: Drugs commonly used in modern medicine for suppression of pain and fever provide only symptomatic relief, and long-term use of these drugs is associated with serious adverse effects. Recently, some evidences suggest that Nigella sativa inhibit eicosanoid generation in leukocytes and lipid peroxidation. They are reported to inhibit both cyclooxygenase and 5-lipooxygenase pathways of arachidonic acid metabolism (Houghton et al. Planta Med 1995;61:33–6).

Aims and Objectives: To investigate the analgesic and antipyretic activity of N. sativa seed fixed oil and compare it with control and aspirin.

Materials and Methods: Albino Wistar rats of either sex weighing 180–200 g and Swiss mice weighing 25–30 g were used. The study was conducted after approval from the Institutional Animal Ethics Committee. The tail flick method in rats described by D’Amour and Smith and acetic acid-induced writhing in mice were used for evaluation of analgesic activity and baker’s yeast-induced pyrexia method was used to evaluate antipyretic activity.

Result: In tail flick method of analgesia, N. sativa showed analgesic activity, which was comparable with aspirin. In acetic acid-induced writhing model of analgesia, the action of N. sativa was significantly greater than the control group, and it was comparable with aspirin. In baker’s yeast-induced pyrexia method, N. sativa group did not show any significant reduction in the rectal temperature at any hour interval. The changes in the rectal temperature in N. sativa group were comparable with control group (p > 0.05).

Conclusion: Nigella sativa fixed oil has significant analgesic activity in both tail flick and acetic acid-induced method of analgesia. But, it does not have any significant antipyretic activity in baker’s yeast-induced pyrexia method.

Key words: Analgesic; Antipyretic; Nigella Sativa; Fixed Oil; Pain


 
ARTICLE TOOLS
Abstract
PDF Fulltext
How to cite this articleHow to cite this article
Citation Tools
Related Records
 Articles by Harshal N Pise
Articles by Sushma S Jadhav
on Google
on Google Scholar


REFERENCES
1. Pain terms: a list with definitions and notes on usage. Recommended by the IASP Subcommittee on Taxonomy. Pain. 1979; 6(3):249. [Pubmed]   
2. Dalal S, Zhukovsky DS. Pathophysiology and management of fever. J Support Oncol. 2006;4:9–16. [Pubmed]   
3. Paarakh PM. Nigella sativa Linn.—A comprehensive review. Indian J Nat Prod Resourc. 2010;1(4):409–29.
4. Houghton P, Zarka R, delas HB, Hoult RS. Fixed oil of Nigella Sativa and derived thymoquinone inhibit eicosanoid generation in leukocytes and membrane lipid peroxidation. Planta Med. 1995;61:33–6. [DOI via Crossref]    [Pubmed]   
5. Abdel-Sater KA. Gastroprotective effects of Nigella sativa oil on the formation of stress gastritis in hypothyroidal rats. Int J Physiol Pathophysiol Pharmacol. 2009;1(2):1–8.
6. D'Armour FE, Smith DL. A method for determining loss of pain sensation. J Pharmacol Exp Ther. 1941;72:74–9.
7. Parmar NS, Prakash S. Evaluation of analgesics, anti-inflammatory and anti-pyretic activity In:(Ed.) Screening Methods in Pharmacology. New Delhi, India: Narosa Publishing House, 2006. pp. 225–6.
8. Dewan S, Kumar S, Kumar VL. Antipyretic effect of latex of Calotropis procera. Indian J Pharmacol. 2000;32:252.
9. World Health Organisation. Fact Sheet N0134 December 2008. Available at: www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs134/en/(assessed February 16, 2013).
10. Ghannadi A, Hajhashemi V, Jafarabadi H. An investigation of analgesic and inflammatory effects of Nigella sativa seed polyphenols. J Med Food. 2005;8(4):488–93. [DOI via Crossref]    [Pubmed]   
11. Tekeoglu I, Dogan A, Ediz L, Budancamanak M, Demirel A. Effects of thymoquinone (volatile oil of black cumin) on rheumatoid arthritis in rat models. Phytother Res. 2007;21(9):895–7. [DOI via Crossref]    [Pubmed]   
12. Hajhashemi V, Ghannadi A, Jafarabadi H. Black cumin seed essential oil, as a potent analgesic and anti-inflammatory drug. Phytother Res. 2004;18(3):195–9. [DOI via Crossref]    [Pubmed]   
13. Bashir MU, Qureshi HJ. Analgesic effect of Nigella sativa seeds extract on experimentally induced pain in albino mice. J Coll Physicians Surg Pak. 2010;20(7):464–7. [Pubmed]   
14. Tanko Y, Mohammad A, Okasha MA, Shuaibu A, Magaji MG, Yaro AH. Analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of ethanol seed extract of Nigella sativa (black cumin) in mice and rats. Eur J Sci Res. 2007;18:277–81.
15. Abdel-Fattah AM, Matsumoto K, Watanabe H. Antinociceptive effects of Nigella sativa oil and its major component, thymoquinone, in mice. Eur J Pharmacol. 2000;400(1):89–97. [DOI via Crossref]   
16. Al-Ghamdi MS. The anti-inflammatory, analgesic and antipyretic activity of Nigella sativa. J Ethnopharmacol. 2001;76:45–8. [DOI via Crossref]   

This Article Cited By the following articles

Antipyretic Activity of Hydroalcoholic Extract of Leaves of Colocasia esculenta
J. Drug Delivery Ther. 2021; 11(1): 65.

1
 
Evaluation of anti-inflammatory, analgesic and TNF-α inhibition (upon RAW 264.7 cell line) followed by the selection of extract (leaf and stem) with respect to potency to introduce anti-oral-ulcer model obtained from Olax psittacorum (Lam.) Vahl in addi
Journal of Ethnopharmacology 2020; 263(): 113146.

2
 
Comparison of the effect of topical use of Nigella Sativa oil and diclofenac gel on osteoarthritis pain in older people: A randomized, double-blind, clinical trial
Journal of Herbal Medicine 2019; (): 100259.

3
 
How to Cite this Article
Pubmed Style

Harshal N Pise, Sushma S Jadhav. Evaluation of analgesic and antipyretic activity of Nigella sativa: an experimental study. Natl J Physiol Pharm Pharmacol. 2016; 6(4): 291-295. doi:10.5455/njppp.2016.6.07022016124


Web Style

Harshal N Pise, Sushma S Jadhav. Evaluation of analgesic and antipyretic activity of Nigella sativa: an experimental study. https://www.njppp.com/?mno=210985 [Access: January 03, 2023]. doi:10.5455/njppp.2016.6.07022016124


AMA (American Medical Association) Style

Harshal N Pise, Sushma S Jadhav. Evaluation of analgesic and antipyretic activity of Nigella sativa: an experimental study. Natl J Physiol Pharm Pharmacol. 2016; 6(4): 291-295. doi:10.5455/njppp.2016.6.07022016124



Vancouver/ICMJE Style

Harshal N Pise, Sushma S Jadhav. Evaluation of analgesic and antipyretic activity of Nigella sativa: an experimental study. Natl J Physiol Pharm Pharmacol. (2016), [cited January 03, 2023]; 6(4): 291-295. doi:10.5455/njppp.2016.6.07022016124



Harvard Style

Harshal N Pise, Sushma S Jadhav (2016) Evaluation of analgesic and antipyretic activity of Nigella sativa: an experimental study. Natl J Physiol Pharm Pharmacol, 6 (4), 291-295. doi:10.5455/njppp.2016.6.07022016124



Turabian Style

Harshal N Pise, Sushma S Jadhav. 2016. Evaluation of analgesic and antipyretic activity of Nigella sativa: an experimental study. National Journal of Physiology, Pharmacy and Pharmacology, 6 (4), 291-295. doi:10.5455/njppp.2016.6.07022016124



Chicago Style

Harshal N Pise, Sushma S Jadhav. "Evaluation of analgesic and antipyretic activity of Nigella sativa: an experimental study." National Journal of Physiology, Pharmacy and Pharmacology 6 (2016), 291-295. doi:10.5455/njppp.2016.6.07022016124



MLA (The Modern Language Association) Style

Harshal N Pise, Sushma S Jadhav. "Evaluation of analgesic and antipyretic activity of Nigella sativa: an experimental study." National Journal of Physiology, Pharmacy and Pharmacology 6.4 (2016), 291-295. Print. doi:10.5455/njppp.2016.6.07022016124



APA (American Psychological Association) Style

Harshal N Pise, Sushma S Jadhav (2016) Evaluation of analgesic and antipyretic activity of Nigella sativa: an experimental study. National Journal of Physiology, Pharmacy and Pharmacology, 6 (4), 291-295. doi:10.5455/njppp.2016.6.07022016124